Jules Verne Predicts the Moon Landing in Ridiculous Detail … in 1865

Keep in mind what life was like in 1865. No Phones – No Air Planes – Steam Engines Used and Very Little Use Of Electricity.

  • (1865) From His Fictional Story “From the Earth to the Moon
    • Verne’s space cannon was called Columbiad
    • Three astronauts on the mission
    • launched in December
    • Launched from the United States
    • Launched in Florida
    • Made mostly of aluminum
    • Astronauts became weightless in space
    • Splashed down into the Pacific Ocean

 

  • (1969) Real NASA Mission “Apollo 8 and 11 Moon Mission3d.jpg
    • Apollo 11 command module was named Columbia
    • Three astronauts on the mission
    • Apollo 8 launched in December
    • Launched from the United States
    • Launched in Florida
    • Made mostly of aluminum
    • Astronauts became weightless in space
    • Splashed down into the Pacific Ocean

 

This is not luck or coincidence.

 

 

Join the conversation! 13 Comments

  1. Have you ever looked into the Nostradamus Predictions?

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  2. Gee, it’s almost like the moon landing his-story moment, took took it’s synopsis from fiction .

    Liked by 1 person

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  3. if you find something interesting please share it.

    Liked by 1 person

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  4. A sci-fi writer writing sci-fi things.
    Who woulda thought? 😉

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  5. Ah, Lander, where is your reason. Verne was a genius, looking back. But looking forward, he was a mathematician–or knew a very good one. He was a scientist–or knew a very good one. He was very logical–or knew someone who was. And he was a storyteller, just like a lot of other science fiction writers. Mathematics explains the boost to overcome Earth’s gravity, and a particular bottom speed and the acceleration needed to achieve that speed. Given a known speed and a known distance it is easy to calculate the travel time. I have not read “Earth to the Moon” in many a moon, but I believe he missed the need to turn halfway to the destination to slow the spacecraft at a rate to bring it to an almost complete stop when it reached the moon. Nor did he see the need for, of all things, a “lander” vehicle used while the capsule set up in orbit around the moon. Did he foresee the need of booster rockets to get the capsule high enough to break free of our gravity? I don’t believe he did. As for weightless flight, it is an obvious observation that if you break free of gravity there will be no gravity to hold a traveler down to something solid. Acceleration would have done the trick, but that would have changed the time for the trip to take and might have made it impossible for the capsule to stop at the moon.

    Geography pretty much spells the need to take off over the Atlantic Ocean and return to Earth in the Pacific Ocean. The rotation of the Earth, once you have chosen a country to build such a rocket, determines the east coast of the USA as the take-off point, and Florida, almost surrounded by water, as the safest point. The Pacific is chosen as the safest point of return as it is the widest ocean in the world, with lots of area to come down in water to avoid smashing into anything with life aboard. Columbiad is a logical name for this spacecraft as the capital city of the USA was in the District of Columbia, or Columbia District.

    All that is looking forward. Now let us look backward. “Earth to the Moon” is now a famous book, with a lot of logical and scientific facts attached to it. Why reinvent the wheel when it has already been done for you? Modern science fiction, in the 60s, had already worked out the physics of spaceflight, including trajectories, windows of opportunity, weather conditions, etc. And making Verne’s story seem to come true was an added attraction to keep the American people’s interest up while large amounts of money were being spent on JFK’s dream. As many bases as could be were covered. It was the accomplishment of an era, set in an era of racial hatred and violence. Politicians wanted Americans to take part in the moon adventure, while ignoring the realities of racial uprisings and the Vietnam War. They succeeded beautifully.

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    • Cleanup completed 😉

      You made some good points but I challenge you to make those with this one. O.o

      https://realitydecoded.blog/2019/02/13/the-titan-vs-the-titanic/

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      • I believe I already have, but it is not my object to tear your conspiracy theories apart. They make good entries into the world of possibility. I just think you are not finding the right stories yet. Your AI machine, whatever you call it, is looking for things that seem to foretell the future without reasoning them out. It will find a lot of food for thought. But it is all random, no matter how you put it together. As in the case of Poe and the dudes in the lifeboat, the one doesn’t predict the othef as much as it gives a raison d’etre for the reality following a piece of fiction. Hopefully someday you will find something I cannot readon away. Time will tell…

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      • Oh, thank you for cleaning my comment up. Much apprecjated.

        Liked by 1 person

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