The Vitruvian Man was created by Leonardo da Vinci around the year 1487. The pen and ink drawing depicts a male figure in two superimposed positions with his arms and legs apart and simultaneously inscribed in a circle and square.

It is stored in the Gallerie dell’Accademia in Venice, Italy.

The image provides a perfect example of Leonardo’s keen interest in proportion.

I have provided the two versions for you to review. One of them is the currently recognized drawing and the other is a recreation of something that the Mandela Effect claims is the original design.

Join the conversation! 8 Comments

  1. Easier to make out the wiener in the Mandela one.

    Liked by 2 people

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  2. One of them is rated NC-17 and the other rated PG-13

    Liked by 2 people

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  3. Never seen this before. Interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  4. I’ll go with number two because the legs in the first drawing seem weirdly out of proportion to the rest of the body..

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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Mandela Effect

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