The DOD authorized scientists to spread, “what was thought harmless”, bacteria (Bacillus Globigii ) across US cities and on public transport.

They were trying to simulate a major bioweapons attack on the US.

During one test in 1966, they dropped light bulbs carrying powdered Bacillus Globigii on the New York City subway. They then stalked citizens to measure how the bacteria spread, using a motorized vacuum devise concealed inside a suitcase.

Later research showed that the strain of Bacillus Globigii did pose a risk to people who were already sick or had weak immune systems.

BG infections result mainly from penetrating exposed injuries, surgical procedures, catheters, and intravenous lines. Debilitated health can occur, fever is a primary symptom in these infections

If it infects a food source then victims could suffer food poisoning resulting in diarrhea and vomiting.

Other symptoms that may occur are sweating, abdominal pain and nausea.

Recovery time ranges from 13 days to 6 weeks.

Join the conversation! 29 Comments

  1. Nice to see our tax payer dollars at work making things worse for the taxpayer. Dang it, what is wrong with these … people. Hugs

    Liked by 4 people

    Reply
    • I’ve learned that despite the titles men give themselves some are cold and don’t care.

      Those people are mixed in everywhere on earth, in every group, every party, every religion, every movement, they are simply everywhere. They stay hidden but they are usually the ones who are the most agreeable where they are.

      They always go with whatever everyone else wants, no matter how monstrous it is.

      Strange

      Liked by 4 people

      Reply
  2. GWB wasn’t joking when he said, “Our enemies are innovative and resourceful, and so are we. They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we.”

    The U.S. military and covert government agencies have been conducting experiments on unsuspecting citizens for a long time.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    • I wonder sometimes… What if it isn’t what we think it is.

      What if it’s only a small percentage of people who take pleasure in such things and they are spread out…. Like an infection, a subset of the human race that likes to cause harm while the rest do not, but don’t stop them.

      Just a thought

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      • I can’t speculate on the number of people who take pleasure in such things, but aren’t we equally culpable for supporting political systems that grant men the power to engage their wicked fantasies?

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
        • You asked — “aren’t we equally culpable for supporting political systems that grant men the power to engage their wicked fantasies?”

          My response — Only if the same rule can be applied everywhere else.

          If a person harms others should the parent should be blamed? Then the state he came from? Then the entire country he works for?

          We would run out of people, everyone would be in jail.

          Simply put everyone is to blame but only the person who did the deed should be punished.

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          Reply
          • I don’t think that parents can be held accountable for the actions of their offspring unless they willfully goaded them into committing those actions. But I think those who consciously elect warmongers to power should be implicated for war crimes, as well.

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            Reply
            • You stated— “But I think those who consciously elect warmongers to power should be implicated”

              My response— I see… How does one know who is and isn’t a warmonger before they are elected?

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              Reply
              • Assuming they haven’t already expressed their position in their campaign platform, you ask them directly.

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                Reply
                • You stated— “Assuming they haven’t already expressed their position in their campaign platform, you ask them directly.”

                  My response— So your solution is to start with assumptions and end with the honor system to detect warmongering individuals.

                  Do you see any challenges there? With a system like that you might elect a saint and give him a peace prize only to realize later he loves war.

                  Just a thought

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                  Reply
                  • My proposal is a bit more nuanced than that. For one thing, political candidates should be required to pass core competency tests prior to being allowed to run for office. If all other professional trades require a license to operate, why should politicians be exempted from meeting similar standards? Second, citizens should also be required to demonstrate they meet minimal educational standards before they can cast a ballot. Third, officeholders should be subject to immediate recall for any breach of trust. Finally, the system should be structured so that such breaches of trust have negligible consequences.

                    And yes, I’m fully aware that this proposal would be a hard sell given the current political climate.

                    Like

                    Reply
                    • You stated — “For one thing, political candidates should be required to pass core competency tests prior to being allowed to run for office.”

                      My response — Can a person pass a test that they are trained to exploit?

                      You stated — “If all other professional trades require a license to operate, why should politicians be exempted from meeting similar standards?”

                      My response — Can the license be expensive enough to keep the poor from running for office?

                      You stated — “Second, citizens should also be required to demonstrate they meet minimal educational standards before they can cast a ballot.”

                      You stated — Does this mean that all citizens will be presented with educational opportunities regardless of the ability to pay for it so that they have a chance to work in office?

                      You stated — “Third, officeholders should be subject to immediate recall for any breach of trust.”

                      My response — Does their own party get to decide if there is a breach of trust or the opposition party?

                      You stated — “Finally, the system should be structured so that such breaches of trust have negligible consequences.”

                      My response — Like un-doing an invasion to Iraq and maybe paying a “Carbon Credit” type thing for women and children killed?

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                    • 1. The tests would be designed to weed out unsuitable/incompetent candidates. But life comes with no guarantees, so a charlatan might still pass through the gates. Hence the reason for rule number three.

                      2. I stated that citizens wishing to vote would need to meet minimal educational standards prior to casting a ballot. Since taxpayer-funded public education is already in place this should not pose a great challenge. But to answer your question: those aspiring to run for public office would have to acquire the necessary credentials at their own expense — the same as for any other profession.

                      3. By design, office holders are ultimately beholden to enact the wishes of their electors, not their parties. Therefore the electors retain the ultimate right to hold a recall.

                      4. We obviously can’t undo the past; but that doesn’t mean we can’t institute preventive measures to mitigate against the possibility of repeating them.

                      Like

                    • You stated — “The tests would be designed to weed out unsuitable/incompetent candidates.”

                      My response — I’ve never seen a test that can’t be passed in a desired way through money and training. Are there any real-world examples of such a test that I could review?

                      You stated – “citizens wishing to vote would need to meet minimal educational standards prior to casting a ballot. Since taxpayer-funded public education is already in place this should not pose a great challenge.”

                      My response — If all that is needed is a high Scholl education then clearly there is no office that has specialized educational needs. I find that a bit strange, are you sure that is all that would be needed? Or are you saying tax provided education exceeds high school?

                      You stated — “By design, office holders are ultimately beholden to enact the wishes of their electors, not their parties. Therefore the electors retain the ultimate right to hold a recall.”

                      My response — So the voters who voted them in should be able to vote them out? This sounds a lot like what we currently have in place. I think you are saying you want more recall options but the challenge may be that during a recall you get the same party line vote. I’m not convinced this is a viable option that would be effective.

                      You stated — “but that doesn’t mean we can’t institute preventive measures to mitigate against the possibility of repeating them.”

                      My response — What would such a measure look like? Do you have a proposed example of how to stop a government from making the same mistakes it’s been making since conception?

                      Like

                    • 1. I’m not sure exactly what you are asking. The whole point of any technical or professional educational undertaking is to acquire the requisite skills needed to fufill the basic job requirements so you can pass the vetting process. Moreover, your starting position is usually commensurate with your level of practical experience. How is this a problem?

                      2. Again, the educational requirements placed on the voters would be less stringent than those placed on the candidates. I’m referring to the fundamental objects of primary education required to create informed and productive citizens outlined in Jefferson’s Rockfish Gap Report:

                      To give to every citizen the information he needs for the transaction of his own business.

                      To enable him to calculate for himself, and to express & preserve his ideas, his contracts & accounts in writing.

                      To improve by reading, his morals and faculties.

                      To understand his duties to his neighbours, & country, and to discharge with competence the functions confided to him by either.

                      To know his rights; to exercise with order & justice those he retains; to choose with discretion the fiduciaries of those he delegates; and to notice their conduct with diligence with candor & judgment.

                      And, in general, to observe with intelligence & faithfulness all the social relations under which he shall be placed.

                      3. I’m saying that electors must retain the right to recall representatives who abandon their duties and responsibilities under the constitution. So yes: it’s viability is entirely dependent upon the willingness of the people to enforce and uphold their constitutional rights.

                      4. For examples of these preventive measures I’ll refer you to the founding documents. Unfortunately, those safeguards have been stripped away by each successive administration ever since the ink dried.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • You stated — “3. I’m saying that electors must retain the right to recall representatives who abandon their duties and responsibilities under the constitution. So yes: it’s viability is entirely dependent upon the willingness of the people to enforce and uphold their constitutional rights.

                      My response — This may be where most of the problems stem from. Most people don’t know anything about the constitution.

                      You stated — “4. For examples of these preventive measures I’ll refer you to the founding documents. Unfortunately, those safeguards have been stripped away by each successive administration ever since the ink dried.

                      I would say that case law is effectively stripping constitutional rights from the citizens and again lack of knowledge of this happening is an issue.

                      It would seem we have a public education issue.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • “It would seem we have a public education issue.”

                      Exactly. If you haven’t done so already, check out “Dumbing Us Down: The Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling” by John Taylor Gotto.

                      When I went to school, there was still a heavy emphasis on doing your own research. Now, it appears, the emphasis is on indoctrination and parroting the politically-approved ideology of the day.

                      “What did you do in school today? Think or believe?” ~ Ralph Nader’s Father

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • Sounds interesting, I will get my hands in it, thanks!

                      Like

  3. Reblogged this on Racheal's Novels and commented:
    And we are supposed to trust the authorities to take care of us..?

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  4. Horrible! Even worse than introducing the cane toad here in Aus (much worse).

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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