Christopher Harmon can see about 18 inches. He can’t hear anything. He’s also quadriplegic, and because he uses a respirator, he can’t talk.

Despite this, he’s written four books using help from his interpreters.

When he was about six years old, doctors diagnosed him with spinocerebellar degeneration. It’s a rare neurological condition that interferes with the communication between his brain and his spine. Doctors told his parents he wouldn’t live until he was 10. One of his bigger challenges came in 2000 when Hennepin County denied his request for translator services.

“I plunged into complete isolation,” he said.

This was overturned later by force and he received services. “The day that my interpreter services started, that was the day I found life cupped in my hands, and that I realized I was free. I could do anything.”

Join the conversation! 1 Comment

  1. I am never giving up!! What wonderful people surround this person!!

    Liked by 1 person

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